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C-N trustees vote to begin process of name change to "University"

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Carson-Newman Board of Trustees Chair Larry Waters (left) speaks with President Randall O’Brien and Provost Kina Mallard following Friday’s vote to begin the process of changing the institution’s name to “Carson-Newman University.”

Carson-Newman Board of Trustees Chair Larry Waters (left) speaks with President Randall O’Brien and Provost Kina Mallard following Friday’s vote to begin the process of changing the institution’s name to “Carson-Newman University.”

Carson-Newman College’s Board of Trustees unanimously voted today to begin the process of changing the institution’s name to “Carson-Newman University.” The change would go into effect after the first of the year. The decision follows months of study conducted by C-N officials, and precedes the School’s steps in changing its charter with the state of Tennessee.

Carson-Newman has long offered master level programs, qualifying it as a university model. The institution currently offers 50 undergraduate majors and seven graduate degrees. Pending approval by SACS (Southern Association of Colleges and Schools), C-N will also offer a Doctor of Education degree in fall of 2013.

“We are excited about this new chapter in the life of Carson-Newman,” said C-N Board Chair Larry Waters. “This decision was not taken lightly, but has been a part of a methodical process of building upon proven successes along with new initiatives and programs.”

Along with more accurately describing the institution, Carson-Newman officials believe that the name change will assist in recruiting, particularly internationally. Carson-Newman currently has 93 international students enrolled representing 24 different nations.

“Many students who inquire about Carson-Newman overseas interpret the name “college” as a high school or vocational school,” explained Provost Kina Mallard. “There is simply a difference in terminology. By embracing “university,” we not only more accurately represent ourselves here at home, but to the global community as well.”

Carson-Newman President Randall O’Brien added that though the move will change in how Carson-Newman is referred to, the Board remains resolute in the role C-N plays in higher education.

“Carson-Newman may change in name and expand in what it academically offers students, but it will do so while holding true to its mission and vision of being intentionally Christian, academically rigorous, student-focused and future-minded,” said O’Brien. “In a rapidly changing world, some things don’t: academic and Christian excellence at Carson-Newman! The future is bright.”

Founded in 1851 as Mossy Creek Missionary Baptist Seminary, the institution has undergone several name changes throughout its history. It has held the name Carson-Newman College since 1930.

For media inquiries, visit the University Relations page.

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